July 31 to August 1- ONLINE SESSIONS
August 5-6 - SESSIONS at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University in New York City 
Graduate Credit Option: University of Michigan-Flint
 
Climate Change in the Classroom is a professional development event for 8th – 12th grade English, Math, Science and Social Studies teachers. The workshop sponsors, GISS, Columbia University, the Science Museum of Minnesota, University of Michigan-Flint, Real World Matters and Mindblue Productions, invite teachers to explore the science underlying global climate change in today's headlines with researchers on the frontlines of advancing knowledge.  A special focus will be developing climate literacy to evaluate energy solutions for mitigating global climate change.  Guided by education faculty, teachers will pilot a new curriculum - Hot: One World, One Climate. CCIC will involve teachers in a learning experience that will deepen understanding about how students learn science, build strategies for using climate change topics as a context for science and math instruction, and facilitate student learning through problem-solving, inquiry and an engaging role-play simulation.            
 
Learn More and Apply @ http://www.giss.nasa.gov/meetings/

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

Join NSTA for this web seminar on July 10 and learn how the Learning Center—NSTA's e-PD portal with over 11,600 resources, a community of like-minded individuals, and professional learning tools—can help you enhance and extend your content and pedagogical knowledge of Earth and Space Science science topics.Register today!

 

This program is designed for educators of grades K-12. The seminar's discussion will focus on resources related to the topics of Earth, Sun, and Moon and the The Solar System. An archive and related PowerPoint presentation will be available at the end of the program.

Details

Title: Enhance Your Content and Pedagogical Knowledge Using NSTA Resources: Earth and Space Science
Target audience: K - 12 teachers
Date: Thursday, July 10, 2014
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Don Boonstra

This webinar is underwritten by the GE Foundation.  NOAA is a Content Collaborator of NSTA's Learning Center



 

On April 22, 2015 please join us for a live webinar showcasing The Wild Center’s Youth Climate Summit — designed by and for high school students. The Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) and The Wild Center have teamed up to share a successful Youth Climate Summit format designed to engage high school students in climate literacy through meaningful dialogue and action planning on climate change. We will highlight this program through a two-hour webinar that will provide an overview of the Youth Climate Summit concept, impacts and outcomes for schools and students, and the planning resources available for free through our Youth Climate Summit Toolkit. Project Director Jen Kretser along with two summit students — Erin Weaver and Meadow Hackett — will be sharing their experiences.

Encouraged by US government leaders and interest by other science centers, our collective goal is to share this convening program format at no cost and support the development of at least 10 Youth Climate Summits across the international science museum community in 2015. We will offer all the organizational tools you will need along with connections to scientific experts in your region.

Climate literacy education continues to be an urgent issue and this program format allows for informal science institutions such as science centers, zoos, aquariums, and non-profits to join in the international effort. Youth Climate Summits have been found to be powerful vehicles for inspiration, learning, community engagement, and youth leadership development. Climate literacy with a focus on local climate impacts and solutions is a key component of the Youth Climate Summit. The project-based learning surrounding the creation of a unique, student driven, sustainability and Climate Action Plan promotes leadership skills applicable to and the tools necessary for a 21st Century workforce. This effort was highlighted as a commitment in support of theWhite House Office of Science & Technology Policy’s Climate Education and Literacy Initiative, with the goal of connecting American students and citizens with the best-available, science-based information about climate change. The meeting is being hosted by the Department of Energy office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy as part of their efforts to support Climate and Energy Literacy.

The Youth Climate Summit Toolkit can be accessed here.

This short video provides an overview of the Adirondack Youth Climate Summit.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Wednesday, April 22
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET
Youth Climate Summit

Please join the webinar from your computer, tablet, or smartphone here:https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/327254349

You can also dial in using your phone:
   United States – +1 (872) 240-3312
   Access Code: 327-254-349

For anyone in the Washington DC area, we invite you to attend in person at the US Department of Energy. Please RSVP to:
Joshua Sneideman, Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
202-586-5695
joshua.sneideman@ee.doe.gov

Learn about integrating climate change education into your classroom or informal education programming, get an introduction to regionally relevant climate science, and hear about how other educators have used these materials. The webinar will be presented by educators who have used the resources in their own teaching, both in the classroom and in place-based education.

Certificates of attendance for professional development contact hours can be requested after the webinar; instructions will be provided during the session.

The presentation will cover:

  • Ohio Sea Grant’s updated Great Lakes Climate Change Curriculum
  • climate and Great Lakes literacy principles
  • informal resources to supplement and expand lesson plans

July 14-18, 2014 
University of Delaware, Virden Center 
Lewes, Delaware

 

Goals of the Climate Science Academy

With the National Science Foundation’s support, climate scientists, learning scientists, and educators are working together to embed climate change science into formal and informal education in Delaware and Maryland. As both states work to implement the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), MADE CLEAR is working at the cutting edge of curriculum alignment, professional content knowledge, assessment development, and implementation strategies. We anticipate that the Academy will be of particular interest to 8th grade science teachers in Delaware. From Maryland, we ask LEA science supervisors to identify a target grade level and form Academy teams that can bring climate change planning back to their LEA. From both states, we encourage the inclusion of informal educators on teacher teams.

While at the five-day Summer Program, your team will design and refine climate change curriculum and assessments under the framework of NGSS. The Summer Program and school year follow-up sessions will give you the opportunity to:

  • enhance your understanding of a range of climate science topics
  • appreciate how climate science involves science/engineering practices, cross-cutting concepts such as systems and energy, and literacy in science and technical subjects
  • collaborate in the design of assessments structured to support NGSS
  • develop a climate curriculum framework to be tested and further developed throughout the school year and a professional development plan to scale up the teaching of climate science across your LEA
  • gain access to a community of experts in climate science disciplines, in local impacts of climate change, and in learning sciences

The goal is to bring the science to you in a way that is meaningful, place-based, and employs best practices in climate science education. While you investigate the science of climate change through focused activities, we will provide opportunities for your team to build an implementation plan that will work for you.

 

 Friday, April 17 at 1:00 PM EDT

In this webinar, a panel of Arctic experts will present the booklet and outline how climate changes currently underway in the Arctic are a driver for global sea-level rise, offer new prospects for natural resource extraction, and have rippling effects through the world’s weather, climate, food supply and economy. The webinar will feature a presentation and Q&A session with:

Julie Brigham-Grette, Professor of Quaternary/Glacial Geology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Chair of the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board, and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of Lessons and Legacies of International Polar Year 2007-2008.

Stephanie Pfirman, Professor of Environmental Sciences at Barnard College and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of The Arctic in the Anthropocene: Emerging Research Questions.

James White, Director of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, Professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Chair of the authoring committee of Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises.

 

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic

Download the Booklet PDF

Register for the webinar

Interactive website — coming soon!

This booklet is an educational resource from the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board that introduces the threats and opportunities of the Arctic’s rapidly changing environment and explains why the Arctic matters — to all of us.

Viewed in satellite images as a jagged white coat draped over the top of the globe, the high Arctic appears distant and isolated. But even if you don’t live there, don’t do business there, and will never travel there, you are closer to the Arctic than you think.

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic draws on a large collection of peer-reviewed National Research Council reports and other national and international reports to provide a brief, reader-friendly primer on the complex ways in which the changes currently affecting the Arctic and its diverse people, resources, and environment can, in turn, affect the entire globe.

 

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

The third National Climate Assessment (NCA) report, released May 6, 2014, is the most comprehensive look at climate change impacts in the United States to date. Based on years of work by hundreds of diverse experts, the NCA (http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/) confirms that climate change is affecting us – and the natural resources we rely on – right now. Join authors of NCA chapters on Ecosystems, Forests, and Adaptation together with representatives from the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the NCA Indicator System to discuss key findings and implications for managers.

 The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Wildlife Federation have developed a series of web conferences to increase communication and transfer of technical information between conservation professionals regarding the increasing challenges from climate change. This program is being facilitated by the USFWS's National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) Applied Landscape Conservation Team.

A partnership between the National Wildlife Federation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Join us for this month's webinar on Thursday, April 30th at 4pm EDT (1pm PDT)

Presented by: Scott Doney, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and Jim Foley, Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education
 
Space is limited
 
At 3400 m (11,155 ft) above the Pacific Ocean, on one of the most isolated mountains in the world, is an observatory that has been meticulously measuring our atmosphere for almost 60 years. Mauna Loa on the Island of Hawaii is more than 3700 km (2300 mi) away from the nearest major land mass, California, yet it is easily accessible. Mauna Loa was chosen by Dr. Charles David Keeling to make atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements because this location allowed access to air masses representative of the northern hemisphere. Since his measurements began in 1958, the concentration of atmospheric CO2 has been marching higher and higher at a rate that can only be attributed to the burning of fossil fuels.

Thirty years after Dr. Keeling began his time-series measurements that would come to be known as the Keeling Curve, another time-series began in Hawaii. This time the measurements were taken at a spot to represent the Pacific Ocean. Dubbed Station ALOHA, it is located 100 km (60 mi) north of Oahu where the depth is 4800 m (15758 ft). Since1988, the Hawaii Ocean Time-Series (HOT) program has been making near monthly four-day research cruises to Station ALOHA to measure how the ocean is changing over time. One of the many measurements taken with the HOT program is the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in seawater. While there is much more variability in seawater, carbon dioxide in the ocean is increasing at the same rate as in the atmosphere. Unlike other atmospheric gasses like oxygen and nitrogen, carbon dioxide reacts with water to form a weak acid that is changing the chemistry of the ocean. While the carbon dioxide of the ocean has increased, the pH of the ocean has decreased, becoming more acidic.

An acidifying ocean will have substantial impacts on the marine life that depends on stable ocean chemistry for survival. Organisms such as corals, oysters, and snails that build body structures out of calcium carbonate will have a particularly tough time with ocean acidification.  Ocean acidification has already had economic impacts for several communities, and even greater impacts may be felt in the future. During this webinar, we will present some of the dangers posed by ocean acidification as well as demonstrations that can be done to discuss the impacts and chemistry of ocean acidification.

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidification communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

 

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

 

The Fine Print: Important Notes for participating in the Webinar 

1.Plan to log into the Webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar is continually upgrading their software. We want to be sure that your computer has time to access any upgrades and you are able to access the presentation and meeting.                   

2. When using the VOIP option for this Webinar, you must use a headset or ear bud-speakers. This will keep your output audio from re-entering your microphone, causing distortion

3. If you have difficulty logging in to the Webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 101-989-683

Are you apprehensive teaching about climate change? Not sure what to believe after reading different headlines and hearing controversies? ClimateChangeLIVE will help you sort it out for yourself and be confident in educating your students about this important topic! This webinar will be presented by education specialists from three federal agencies immersed in climate change research and issues. We’ll be joined by EPA’s 2012 Climate Communicator of the Year, the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE). ACE will share tips about how to engage your students, and how your class can be part of the solution, addressing climate change head-on. We’ll feature highlights of materials focused on the process of science, how to judge whether what you’re reading is good science, as well as misconceptions about climate change. The Department of Energy will highlight the Energy Literacy Framework, which identifies the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts one would understand to be energy and climate literate.

Presenters: U.S. Forest Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Dept. of Energy, Alliance for Climate Education

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