ClimateChangeLIVE distance learning adventure, brings you a wealth of climate change education resources and programs from 17 Federal agencies and non-profit organizations! We offer educators, a source of trusted, science-based materials, which are correlated to science education standards. This webinar highlights climate change education resources from three of our partners. Project Learning Tree and the U.S. Forest Service will introduce their GreenSchools! program and how you can foster student-led efforts to move your school toward sustainability. The Forest Service will highlight the Natural Inquirer science education journal’s Climate Collection which takes real-life Forest Service research, and engages students in the science inquiry method, along with activities tied to the research.

Presenters: Project Learning Tree, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Dr. Kathleen Tierney, Director of the CU Boulder’s Natural Hazards Center and Dr. Kevin Trenberth from the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will join facilitators Dr. Anne Gold of CIRES and Deb Morrison of University Colorado Boulder in an interactive panel discussion. 

These experts will discuss how scientists can forecast where extreme events will occur and their severity. They will cover what communities and governments  can do to increase resiliency to extreme weather events and how the scientific community can help prepare citizens and government. 

Preparing for or responding to an environmental disasters requires knowledge from many disciplines and real time interdisciplinary problem solving. The interaction between the extreme event, people in its path and the response mechanisms of government and business combine at one place and time. How do we prepare students for careers where they can make useful and valuable contributions that mitigate risks and increase resilience in the face of a growing population and changing environment? What do students need to know about risk and resilience? What foundational knowledge will prepare them to communicate with, learn from, and work with experts from the range of disciplines that are needed to address these problems?

This workshop will bring together educators from the variety of disciplines that prepare students to address natural disasters with those currently engaged in addressing these challenges. Focusing on three case studies, we will share best practices in education to help students to understand needs of different stakeholders and to prepare students for careers related to hazard mitigation and adaptation. We will consider how partnerships among academia, civil society, and the business community will enhance both student learning and community preparedness. We will identify needs for curricular resources and discuss how to meet these needs.

This workshop is open to 30 faculty (by application) and there is no registration fee to attend. Participation for non-academics is by invitation. Workshop stipends are available to help defray travel expenses in cases of financial need. Accepted participants are expected to contribute teaching materials to a new web-based collection devoted to teaching about risk and resilience across the disciplines.

Join Second Nature and the Security & Sustainability Forum for a webinar on the role of higher education in creating a sustained national climate assessment.  The National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee (NCADAC) delivered a Special Report on Preparing the Nation for Change: Building a Sustained National Climate  Assessment Process to the FederalGovernment this year.  The report provides Federal managers  with advice and recommendations toward the development of an ongoing, sustained national assessment of global change impacts and adaptation and mitigation strategies for the nation.  A panel of primary authors of this report will summarize the report's findings and recommendations. 

Panelists: 

  • Moderator: James Buizer 
  • Overview of the Sustained National Climate Assessment: Sharon Hays 
  • Collaborative partnerships that sustain assessment activities: Amy Luers 
  • The scientific foundations of a Sustained Assessment toward managing the risks and opportunities of climate change: Richard Moss 
  • The role of higher education in a Sustained National Climate Assessment: Anne Waple

Josh Sniedeman is this year’s Department of Energy’s Einstein Science Educator Fellow.  He will introduce the Energy Literacy Essential Principles developed with the goal of building an energy literate public. In addition, we will introduce the Will Steger Foundation’s Experience Energy Curriculum and Mike Arquin, founder of Kidwind will demonstrate one of Kidwind’s many great activities.

 

 

Josh Sniedeman Josh Sniedeman is the current Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow for the Department of Energy – a distinction awarded to outstanding k-12 STEM educators. Sniedeman will be guiding us through an in-depth look at energy literacy and what it means for educators.
 


Michael ArquinMichael Arquin is the Founder and Director of KidWind, a leading resource for hands-on, classroom-friendly renewable energy projects. KidWind curricula and classroom wind-turbine kits are used by educators around the country and across many grade levels. Arquin will share with us some of their most-popular activities.
 
Attendees will also be introduced to Experience Energy, a curriculum developed by the Will Steger Foundation to engage elementary and middle school students in Minnesota energy literacy.

 

What are the climate impacts expected in your region of the United States, and how can you use existing tools and scenarios to better understand them?  This webinar will provide an overview of the regional climate scenarios developed as a part of the National Climate Assessment including how to use them, how they were produced, where to find them, and the potential use in risk or opportunity assessment for higher education.  

Panelists: 

  • Moderator: Anne Waple, Former Chair of the National Climate Assessment Technical Support Unit, current Director of Communications & Science for Second Nature
  • Ken Kunkel, NOAA Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites and Scientist-at-Large for the National Climate Assessment
  • Adam Parris - Program Director for NOAA's Regional Integrated Science and Assessments, and lead author on "Global Sea Level Rise Scenarios for the United States National Climate Assessment"

To learn more about the Climate Resilience series, visit secondnature.org/programs/resilience

The second in the four-part webinar series takes place on November 13 at 4.30 MT, 5.30 CT, 6.30 ET and 3.30 PT . The webinar will involve three hydrologists from the US Geological Survey:  Dr. Jeff Writer,Dr. Brian Ebel and Sheila Murphy.

Jeff specializes in wildfire impacts on water quality and aquatic ecosystems, coupling of ecological and engineered infrastructure, fate and transport of emerging contaminants. Brian specializes in unsaturated flow and soil physics, surface water/groundwater interaction, hillslope hydrology and runoff generation, landslide and debris flow initiation, and post-wildfire hydrology. Sheila’s research focuses on the characterization of the hydrology and water chemistry of small watersheds and how they are affected by both natural factors and disturbance.

The webinar will be streaming video from the CU Boulder campus, and will take questions from the live chat. 

Speaker: Minda Berbeco, PhD, Programs and Policy Director, National Center for Science Education
Resources: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN),PINEMAP, WSF Curriculum

How can educators teach children about local impacts of climate change? Where can they find good resources for activities and up-to-date scientific information from reputable sources? Minda Berbeco is the Programs and Policy Director at the National Center for Science Education. She will be talking about the newly released National Climate Assessment, a scientific and governmental resource that demonstrates the local impacts on climate change and projections for the future. She will present on how to bring the NCA into the classroom and what vetted resources are available. We will focus on resources to make climate change local and relevant.

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth’s Systems addresses questions such as “What regulates weather and climate?” and “What causes earthquakes and volcanoes?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • why it's important for students to understand Earth's systems
  • how students' understanding of Earth's systems might progress over their K-12 education
  • how ideas that students have about Earth's systems can be leveraged during instruction; and
  • how to incorporate the scientific and engineering practices into instruction so students can deepen their understanding of Earth's systems

March 12, 2014
Time: LIVE from 1 - 2 p.m. Eastern Time
Archive available after March 12

This program will feature:

  • LIVE interactive conversation about climate change with experts
  • Send us your tweets, post on Facebook, or send an e-mail to climate change experts

For links and resources mentioned in the webcast are posted on the ClimateChangeLive page.

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