This video features University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher John Magnuson, who studies the ecology of freshwater systems. He explains the difference between weather and climate using data on ice cover from Lake Mendota in Madison, WI. Analysis of the data indicates a long-term trend that can be connected to climate change.

This PBS video shows how Klaus Lackner, a geophysicist at Columbia University, is trying to tackle the problem of rising atmospheric CO2 levels by using an idea inspired by his daughter's 8th-grade science fair project.

In this activity, students develop an understanding of the relationship between natural phenomena, weather, and climate change: the study known as phenology. In addition, they learn how cultural events are tied to the timing of seasonal events. Students brainstorm annual natural phenomena that are tied to seasonal weather changes. Next, they receive information regarding the Japanese springtime festival of Hanami, celebrating the appearance of cherry blossoms. Students plot and interpret average bloom date data from over the past 1100 years.

This video segment uses data-based visual NOAA representations to trace the path of surface ocean currents around the globe and explore their role in creating climate zones. Ocean surface currents have a major impact on regional climate around the world, bringing coastal fog to San Francisco and comfortable temperatures to the British Isles.

This video presents predictions and solutions for range shifts (wildlife corridors) by an iconic species of North American wilderness: the wolverine.

These animations depict the three major Milankovitch Cycles that impact global climate, visually demonstrating the definitions of eccentricity, obliquity, and precession, and their ranges of variation and timing on Earth.

October 6, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

Our Featured speaker is Dr. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences and Associate of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute at The Pennsylvania State University. He will be giving our main presentation Bungy Jumping off the Ice-Core Roller Coaster: Ice-Core Records of Global Warming and Abrupt Climate Change

Dr. Alley will discuss how ice cores provide remarkably accurate records of climate changes locally, regionally and globally. Ice-core records of ice age cycles contribute to our understanding that CO2 has been “the biggest control knob” of Earth’s overall climate, and thus that if we continue burning fossil fuels and releasing the CO2, we will have large impacts on climate. But, ice-core records also show how changes in ocean circulation have had large, rapid regional impacts. The existence of such abrupt climate changes contributes to our understanding that, if scientists are wrong about the influence of CO2 on climate, changes are likely to be more-damaging than expected rather than less-damaging. 

Please forward this invitation to all interested colleagues and networks

Join Second Nature and the Security & Sustainability Forum for a webinar on the role of higher education in creating a sustained national climate assessment.  The National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee (NCADAC) delivered a Special Report on Preparing the Nation for Change: Building a Sustained National Climate  Assessment Process to the FederalGovernment this year.  The report provides Federal managers  with advice and recommendations toward the development of an ongoing, sustained national assessment of global change impacts and adaptation and mitigation strategies for the nation.  A panel of primary authors of this report will summarize the report's findings and recommendations. 

Panelists: 

  • Moderator: James Buizer 
  • Overview of the Sustained National Climate Assessment: Sharon Hays 
  • Collaborative partnerships that sustain assessment activities: Amy Luers 
  • The scientific foundations of a Sustained Assessment toward managing the risks and opportunities of climate change: Richard Moss 
  • The role of higher education in a Sustained National Climate Assessment: Anne Waple

Webinar 1: Tuesday, October 7 - 6:30 pm EST / 3:30 PST/ 12:30 HST (90 min)

Join us for the first of two webinars for an introduction to our newest NOAA Data in the Classroom curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data. You'll hear from NOAA experts about coral bleaching and how scientists use remote sensing tools to study stresses on coral health. The NODE curriculum developers will introduce the new lesson plans and demonstrate how our unique scaffolding can help students develop skills to access and use online data.

The NOAA Data in the Classroom Project develops curriculum designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional or global scale. Each curriculum module features easy-to-use curriculum materials and specially designed websites that enable students to access and use real data. Our newest curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data – is being developed for grades 6-8.

  • Introduction to the NODE Project
  • Coral Bleaching 101 with NOAA Experts
  • Coral Reef Watch: Studying Corals from Space
  • Overview of the entire curriculum module

The second in the four-part webinar series takes place on November 13 at 4.30 MT, 5.30 CT, 6.30 ET and 3.30 PT . The webinar will involve three hydrologists from the US Geological Survey:  Dr. Jeff Writer,Dr. Brian Ebel and Sheila Murphy.

Jeff specializes in wildfire impacts on water quality and aquatic ecosystems, coupling of ecological and engineered infrastructure, fate and transport of emerging contaminants. Brian specializes in unsaturated flow and soil physics, surface water/groundwater interaction, hillslope hydrology and runoff generation, landslide and debris flow initiation, and post-wildfire hydrology. Sheila’s research focuses on the characterization of the hydrology and water chemistry of small watersheds and how they are affected by both natural factors and disturbance.

The webinar will be streaming video from the CU Boulder campus, and will take questions from the live chat. 

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