Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

The energy we use to heat and light our homes, drive to work and school and watch our favorite television show can come from a variety of traditional and renewable energy sources -- crude oil, natural gas, wind farms, hydroelectric power and coal-fired power plants. But how do we understand the costs and benefits of the energy choices we make? What happens if the mix of energy sources changes in the future? What does this all mean for our climate, air, water, and overall environmental quality? Learn about the scientific tools EPA scientists are developing to help states, communities and Tribes make decisions about energy use now and in the future. Explore an interactive board game developed by EPA scientists called Generate! that explores energy choices and the environment and gets students “energized” in some friendly competition.

Details

Target audience: K-12 teachers
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Rebecca Dodder

What are the climate impacts expected in your region of the United States, and how can you use existing tools and scenarios to better understand them?  This webinar will provide an overview of the regional climate scenarios developed as a part of the National Climate Assessment including how to use them, how they were produced, where to find them, and the potential use in risk or opportunity assessment for higher education.  

Panelists: 

  • Moderator: Anne Waple, Former Chair of the National Climate Assessment Technical Support Unit, current Director of Communications & Science for Second Nature
  • Ken Kunkel, NOAA Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites and Scientist-at-Large for the National Climate Assessment
  • Adam Parris - Program Director for NOAA's Regional Integrated Science and Assessments, and lead author on "Global Sea Level Rise Scenarios for the United States National Climate Assessment"

To learn more about the Climate Resilience series, visit secondnature.org/programs/resilience

Monday, September 8, 2014 at 7:30 Eastern Time

Mark McCaffrey, Director of Collaborative Partnerships at the National Center for Science Education, is the featured speaker this month for the Climate Stewards project. He will address the questions: How can we best provide learners with authentic data and current research into climate changes that are already occurring in the United States? What is the National ClimateAssessment and how can I use its resources in my classroom? What are some of the best online resources for teaching about climate challenges and energy responses, and how do they tie to the Next Generation Science Standards? In his presentation, Mark will provide an overview of the learning pathways developed for educators that help them unpack the National Climate Assessment. He will also highlight insights for educators from his book Climate Smart & Energy Wise including how to address doubt, denial and despair when teaching about these challenging topics. 

Following Mark's presentation, Cindy Schmidt, Director of NCAR's Climate Voices Science Speakers Network will provide an overview of the project which works bring climate scientists directly in touch with students and members of the community to discuss the local effects of a changing climate and possible ways to address impacts.

Please forward this invitation to all interested colleagues and networks

The Fine Print: Important Notes for participating in the Webinar

  • Plan to log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software and we want to be sure you are able to access the meeting at the assigned start time.    
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this Webinar. If you elect to use the phone number provided for audio +1 (951) 266-6126, access code: 546-482-116, you will be charged for a long distance call. You do not need an Audio Pin number to listen to the meeting.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 851-182-978

Join Second Nature and the Security & Sustainability Forum for a webinar on the role of higher education in creating a sustained national climate assessment.  The National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee (NCADAC) delivered a Special Report on Preparing the Nation for Change: Building a Sustained National Climate  Assessment Process to the FederalGovernment this year.  The report provides Federal managers  with advice and recommendations toward the development of an ongoing, sustained national assessment of global change impacts and adaptation and mitigation strategies for the nation.  A panel of primary authors of this report will summarize the report's findings and recommendations. 

Panelists: 

  • Moderator: James Buizer 
  • Overview of the Sustained National Climate Assessment: Sharon Hays 
  • Collaborative partnerships that sustain assessment activities: Amy Luers 
  • The scientific foundations of a Sustained Assessment toward managing the risks and opportunities of climate change: Richard Moss 
  • The role of higher education in a Sustained National Climate Assessment: Anne Waple

October 6, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

Our Featured speaker is Dr. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences and Associate of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute at The Pennsylvania State University. He will be giving our main presentation Bungy Jumping off the Ice-Core Roller Coaster: Ice-Core Records of Global Warming and Abrupt Climate Change

Dr. Alley will discuss how ice cores provide remarkably accurate records of climate changes locally, regionally and globally. Ice-core records of ice age cycles contribute to our understanding that CO2 has been “the biggest control knob” of Earth’s overall climate, and thus that if we continue burning fossil fuels and releasing the CO2, we will have large impacts on climate. But, ice-core records also show how changes in ocean circulation have had large, rapid regional impacts. The existence of such abrupt climate changes contributes to our understanding that, if scientists are wrong about the influence of CO2 on climate, changes are likely to be more-damaging than expected rather than less-damaging. 

Please forward this invitation to all interested colleagues and networks

The second in the four-part webinar series takes place on November 13 at 4.30 MT, 5.30 CT, 6.30 ET and 3.30 PT . The webinar will involve three hydrologists from the US Geological Survey:  Dr. Jeff Writer,Dr. Brian Ebel and Sheila Murphy.

Jeff specializes in wildfire impacts on water quality and aquatic ecosystems, coupling of ecological and engineered infrastructure, fate and transport of emerging contaminants. Brian specializes in unsaturated flow and soil physics, surface water/groundwater interaction, hillslope hydrology and runoff generation, landslide and debris flow initiation, and post-wildfire hydrology. Sheila’s research focuses on the characterization of the hydrology and water chemistry of small watersheds and how they are affected by both natural factors and disturbance.

The webinar will be streaming video from the CU Boulder campus, and will take questions from the live chat. 

Webinar 1: Tuesday, October 7 - 6:30 pm EST / 3:30 PST/ 12:30 HST (90 min)

Join us for the first of two webinars for an introduction to our newest NOAA Data in the Classroom curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data. You'll hear from NOAA experts about coral bleaching and how scientists use remote sensing tools to study stresses on coral health. The NODE curriculum developers will introduce the new lesson plans and demonstrate how our unique scaffolding can help students develop skills to access and use online data.

The NOAA Data in the Classroom Project develops curriculum designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional or global scale. Each curriculum module features easy-to-use curriculum materials and specially designed websites that enable students to access and use real data. Our newest curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data – is being developed for grades 6-8.

  • Introduction to the NODE Project
  • Coral Bleaching 101 with NOAA Experts
  • Coral Reef Watch: Studying Corals from Space
  • Overview of the entire curriculum module

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth’s Systems addresses questions such as “What regulates weather and climate?” and “What causes earthquakes and volcanoes?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • why it's important for students to understand Earth's systems
  • how students' understanding of Earth's systems might progress over their K-12 education
  • how ideas that students have about Earth's systems can be leveraged during instruction; and
  • how to incorporate the scientific and engineering practices into instruction so students can deepen their understanding of Earth's systems

Webinar 2: Tuesday, October 21 – 6:30 pm EST / 3:30 PST/ 12:30 HST (90 min)

Join us for the second of two webinars for an introduction to our newest NOAA Data in the Classroom curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data. You'll hear from NOAA experts about coral bleaching and how scientists use remote sensing tools to study stresses on coral health. The NODE curriculum developers will introduce the new lesson plans and demonstrate how our unique scaffolding can help students develop skills to access and use online data.

The NOAA Data in the Classroom Project develops curriculum designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional or global scale. Each curriculum module features easy-to-use curriculum materials and specially designed websites that enable students to access and use real data. Our newest curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data – is being developed for grades 6-8.

  • Guided walk-thru of curriculum lesson plans
  • Building students' capabilities using real data
  • Using NGSS, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Cross Cutting Concepts
  • Climate Literacy and Coral Bleaching

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth and Human Activity addresses questions such as “How do humans depend on Earth’s resources?” and “How do humans change the planet?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • which concepts are central to an understanding of Earth and human activity
  • how students' understanding of Earth and human activity might progress over their K-12 education; and
  • what students engaging in scientific and engineering practices to understand Earth and human activity looks like in the classroom

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