In this 3-part lesson, students explore California climate and factors that are leading to changes within this climate system. Students begin by exploring California's climate and the state's topography. Next, they investigate coastal versus inland climate. Finally, they use My NASA Data to explore the effects of El NiÃo/La NiÃa on two locations found at the same latitude.

This Energy Flow Charts website is a set of energy Sankey diagrams or flow charts for 136 countries constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and reflects the energy use patterns for 2007.

This video is one of a series from the Switch Energy project. It presents pros and cons of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. In this video, new fracking technologies are presented as more economical and environmentally safe.

This video profiles glaciologist Lonnie Thompson and his research into tropical mountain glaciers as a way to understand climate history. Beginning in the 1970s, Thompson recognized that tropical ice cores contain information relating to tropical climate phenomena, including El NiÃo events and monsoons. These phenomena are not archived in ice from polar regions. Thompson explains that his archive of ice cores is full of clues that, taken together with records collected from around the world, can help scientists create a timeline that tells Earth's climate story.

This detailed animated map shows global weather and climate events from the beginning of 2009 to the present. As the animation plays, specific events are highlighted to provide context and details for the viewer.

This short video, adapted from NOVA, explains how Earth's position relative to the Sun might be responsible for the dramatic shift in the climate of what is now the Saharan nation of Djibouti.

April 17, 2014, at 4 p.m. EDT

From proxy data to direct observations, all signs point to the same conclusion: Earth's climate system is warming at an unprecedented rate. Join presenter Margaret Mooney from the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies to learn more about how scientists measure and document warming trends along with tools to teach this topic to your students.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

"Ask NICE" Online Professional Development Series

Join the NASA Innovations in Climate Education, or NICE, team for the final webinar of the 2013-14 school year in their series of Google Plus Hangout professional development sessions. Extended workshops will be held over the summer with those who have participated in the series. A new series of online Ask NICE sessions will begin in the fall.

For more information, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/ or http://dln.nasa.gov. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

Where in the United States would the use of solar panels be most effective? This web seminar features the “Solar Cell Energy Availability From Around the Country” activity from MY NASA DATA. During this seminar you will become familiar with the activity by comparing the monthly averages of surface downward radiation in various locations around the United States and analyzing areas where the population would be more or less conducive to having solar panels. 

Register today!

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

The International Academy of the Digital Arts & Sciences has chosen NOAA Climate.gov as one of five nominees for the annual Webby Awards for online excellence. We’re nominated in both the 'Government' and 'Green' categories. If you're a fan of our site, please consider voting for us in those categories.

Voting is open from now until April 24. You do have to register/login, but you can use your Facebook, Google, or Twitter logins, or an email address with no additional personal info.

Vote for Climate.gov in the Government category.

Vote for the "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.

The Webby Awards is the Internet's most respected symbol of success (much like a Grammy or an Oscar), so it's an honor just to be nominated. Out of the millions of sites, videos, ads, and mobile apps in existence, and the tens of thousands that were submitted for consideration, only a handful of Nominees were selected by the Academy for The 18th Annual Webby Awards. 

If you are a regular visitor to the Teaching Climate section of NOAA Climate.gov, you are most likely familiar with our reviewed resources, videos, and professional development events. But those are just some of the features that NOAA Climate.gov has to offer.

Across our website's four main sections, we promote public understanding of climate science and climate-related events, to make our data products and services easy to access and use, to provide climate-related support to the private sector and the Nation’s economy, and to serve people making climate-related decisions with tools and resources that help them answer specific questions.

NOAA Climate.gov is a team effort.  It would not be possible to produce and publish the site without contributions from more than a dozen personnel from across NOAA and from among our valued partners. And, most especially, our nomination wouldn't have been possible without the work of NOAA's and its partners' world-class climate science research, data products, and services that are routinely featured in the site.  

We would greatly appreciate your support, and hope you keep visiting us! 

Vote for NOAA Climate.gov in the Government category.

Vote for NOAA Climate.gov's "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.

 

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