In this EarthLabs activity, learners explore the concepts of coral bleaching, bleaching hot spots and degree-heating weeks. Using data products from NOAA's Coral Reef Watch, students identify bleaching hot spots and degree-heating weeks around the globe as well as in the Florida Keys' Sombrero Reef to determine the impact higher-than-normal sea surface temperatures have on coral reefs.

This animation presents the characteristics of wind power as a source of clean energy. The force of moving air generates electricity, by rotating blades around a rotor. The motion of the rotor turns a driveshaft that drives an electric generator.

The heart of this activity is a laboratory investigation that models the production of silicon. The activity is an investigation of silicon: the sources, uses, properties, importance in the fields of photovoltaics (solar cells/renewable energy) and integrated circuits industries, and, to a limited extent, environmental impact of silicon production.

This is a global land surface air temperature graphic showing four overlapping time-series datasets based on records from 1961 - 2000.

This video reviews how photovoltaic (PV) cells work, noting that technological innovations are decreasing costs and allowing PV use to expand.

This visualization is a website with an interactive calculator that allows for estimation of greenhouse gas production from croplands in the United States.

Explore the science of climate change, and how scientists study climate and make predictions using modeling. This NASA-funded course will take place over three weeks, both online and onsite at AMNH, and will be co-taught by Museum educators and climate scientists.

Funding is provided by NASA's Global Climate Change Education Program under Grant Number NNX10AB59A.

Monday, April 7, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

Frank Niepold, NOAA Climate Program Office's Education coordinator, will discuss developing student’s 21st century skills by incorporating digitally available activities, videos, and visualizations into the classroom. The rigorously reviewed digital educational resources developed by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) and syndicated through NOAA’s Climate.gov web site will be examined. A focal point will be how to teach a climate and energy learning progression across elementary through high school grades taking into account contact time and coherence matter constraints.

Thursday, March 26th - 3:30-4:45pm MT/4:30pm CT/5:30pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Kristen Poppleton from the Will Steger Foundation. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. Focus this month will be on the Great Plains region.  Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

 

Plan to join us for a day of learning and sharing about climate change and climate change education. What do we know about how people learn about climate change? Learn about the most effective strategies to help others make informed decisions. Hear from experts about the outlook for the D.C. region. Discover resources that exist in our community that could help your program or project.

To apply: Please complete an application before February 13th, 2013

More information about CUSP can be found here.

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