This web page from the National Snow and Ice Data Center contains two related visualizations. The first visualization gives an estimate of the percent contribution to sea level change since the 1990s from three contributors - small glaciers and ice caps, the Greenland Ice Sheet and the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The second visualization shows the cumulative contribution to sea level from small glaciers and ice caps plotted with the annual global surface air temperature anomaly.

This video discusses the social and economic impacts (worldwide and in the US) of sea level rise caused by global warming (aired April 1, 2011).

Global Sea Level Rise Scenarios for the United States National Climate Assessment

Global sea level has been steadily rising for decades and is expected to continue. Scientists have very high confidence that global sea level will rise at least another 8 inches and as much as 6.6 feet by 2100, causing significant impacts in U.S. coastal regions.  This report lays out the science and describes possible scenarios to help planners and policy leaders assess the risks.

2012 Arctic Report Card

The annual Report Card provides clear, concise scientific information on the state of the Arctic region, organized into 5 sections: Atmosphere, Sea Ice & Ocean, Marine Ecosystems, Terrestrial Ecosystems, and Hydrology & Terrestrial Cryosphere. This edition was prepared by an international team of 121 scientists from 14 different countries. Independent peer-review of the 2012 Report Card was organized by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme of the Arctic Council.

Sea Level Rise Viewer

A map-based decision support tool for coastal managers and scientists to plan for different sea level rise scenarios and potential coastal flooding impacts.

Arctic Report Card: 2011

The annual Report Card provides clear, concise scientific information on the state of the Arctic region, organized into 5 sections: Atmosphere, Sea Ice & Ocean, Marine Ecosystems, Terrestrial Ecosystems, and Hydrology & Terrestrial Cryosphere.  This edition was prepared by an international team of 121 scientists from 14 different countries.  Independent peer-review of the 2011 Report Card was organized by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme of the Arctic Council.

Coastal County Snapshots

Coastal County Snapshots turn complex data into easy-to-understand stories, complete with charts and graphs. Users select a coastal county of interest and the website does the rest, providing information that can help communities become more resilient to coastal hazards.

Maine's Climate Future

A report that considers past change over geologic time, recent evidence of accelerated rates of change, and the implications of continued climate change in Maine during the 21st century as a result of greenhouse gas emissions and their associated pollutants.

State of the Climate in 2010

Over 360 authors from 45 countries contributed to this comprehensive appraisal of the Earth’s climate. Observations from pole-to-pole show climate patterns such as La Niña and El Niño contributed to some climate events this year. Trends consistent with manmade climate change over the last 50 years are also continuing. These include warming temperatures, melting glaciers and saltier seas, which are related to rising atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

Adapting to Climate Change: A Planning Guide for State Coastal Managers

A guide from NOAA Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management to help coastal managers develop and implement adaptation plans in the face of climate change. The guide is designed to help U.S. state and territorial coastal managers develop and implement adaptation plans to reduce the impacts and consequences of climate change and climate variability. It was written in response to a request from state coastal managers for guidance from NOAA on adaptation planning in the coastal zone.

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