NOAA's Susan Solomon was awarded the 2009 Volvo Environment Prize for her pioneering contributions in atmospheric chemistry and physics.

This short video from Climate Central explains the technology used to monitor changes in Arctic sea ice. Long-term tracking (since the late 1970's) shows Arctic sea ice has been on a steady decline and this could have significant implications for global temperatures.

In this video, a spokesperson for the National Climactic Data Center describes the methods of using satellites (originally designed for observing changes in the weather) to study changes in climate from decade to decade. The video clearly illustrates the value of satellite data and begins to address connections between weather and climate.

Students consider why the observed atmospheric CO2 increase rate is only ~60% of the CO2 loading rate due to fossil fuel combustion. They develop a box-model to simulate the atmospheric CO2 increase during the industrial era and compare it to the historic observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The model is then used to forecast future concentrations of atmospheric CO2 during the next century.

Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis

On September 27, 2013, Working Group I of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) presented its report to member governments for approval and acceptance. The report is the first of four that will make up the IPCC's 5th Assessment.

NOAA Coastal and Ocean Climate Applications funding

The Coastal and Ocean Climate Applications (COCA) program addresses the needs of specific decision makers grappling with pressing climate-related issues in coastal and marine environments. This program strengthens initiatives to support interdisciplinary applications research aimed at addressing climate-related challenges in coastal communities as well as coastal and marine ecosystems.

Grants are available annually for researchers and decision makers.

The focal theme of this year's EMS Annual Meeting is High Impact Weather: Working in Partnership to Reduce Risk. By focusing talks and sessions around this theme, organizers hope to emphasize the partnership dimension of meteorological services.

This year's theme for the annual forum held in Washington, DC is “the value and sustainability of the weather, water and climate enterprise.” Recent research indicates that the annual economic impact of weather events is as much as $485 billion in the United States.

2013 Draft National Climate Assessment

 

Global climate is changing, and this is apparent across the U.S. in a wide range of observations. Rising temperatures, changes in precipitation and extreme events and their causes and impacts on society and the environment are chronicled in the 2013 National Climate Assessment. A team of over 240 experts compiled the report, which is open for public comment through April 12, 2013.

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