This short video, adapted from NOVA, explains how Earth's position relative to the Sun might be responsible for the dramatic shift in the climate of what is now the Saharan nation of Djibouti.

Global Sea Level Rise Scenarios for the United States National Climate Assessment

Global sea level has been steadily rising for decades and is expected to continue. Scientists have very high confidence that global sea level will rise at least another 8 inches and as much as 6.6 feet by 2100, causing significant impacts in U.S. coastal regions.  This report lays out the science and describes possible scenarios to help planners and policy leaders assess the risks.

Arctic Report Card: 2011

The annual Report Card provides clear, concise scientific information on the state of the Arctic region, organized into 5 sections: Atmosphere, Sea Ice & Ocean, Marine Ecosystems, Terrestrial Ecosystems, and Hydrology & Terrestrial Cryosphere.  This edition was prepared by an international team of 121 scientists from 14 different countries.  Independent peer-review of the 2011 Report Card was organized by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme of the Arctic Council.

Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion (2010)

This is the most recent assessment of ozone depletion. Produced by the WMO and UNEP every four years since 1985, the assessment is the work of over 300 scientists including some from NOAA. The 2010 report highlights advances in the understanding of the role greenhouse gases play in ozone alteration. It also includes updated information for policymakers including ozone projections for the 21st century.

Climate Change Impacts: Gulf of the Farallones and Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuaries

A 2010 report on climate change impacts and climate change action plans for marine ecosystems on California's north-central coast.

Coastal Strategies for Addressing Climate Change

A collection of case studies and information about how coastal communities can plan for and adapt to climate change. These resources represent a national guide for how coastal communities can plan and adapt. Case study issues range from coastal managers addressing sea level rise in Rhode Island to coral bleaching caused by rising sea temperatures in Florida.

Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States Cover

Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States (2009)

Climate changes are underway in the United States and are projected to grow. Consequently, crops and livestock production will be increasingly challenged and threats to human health will increase. These are two key findings presented in this 2009 assessment report by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. The report gives an overview of climate-related issues and impacts for seven geographical regions and seven sectors of society.

Thresholds of Climate Change in Ecosystems

An assessment of the potential for abrupt state changes or regime shifts in ecosystems in response to climate change.  Better understanding of sudden changes to ecosystems, and the goods and services they provide, is extremely important if natural resource managers are to succeed in developing adaptation strategies.

Coastal Sensitivity to Sea Level Rise: A Focus on the Mid-Atlantic Region

Global sea level is rising at an accelerating rate. This report examines the implications of rising sea level, with a focus on the U.S. mid-Atlantic region, where storm impacts occur and there is a large extent of critical habitat, high population densities, and infrastructure in low-lying areas.

Past Climate Variability and Change in the Arctic and at High Latitudes

Over the past 30 years, average temperatures in the Arctic have increased at almost twice the rate of the planet as a whole. Such temperature changes have been accompanied by shrinking sea ice, melting ice and permafrost on land, and widespread impacts to land and ocean ecosystems.

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