Includes sea level rise; extreme weather; changes to ecosystems, plants and animals; melting ice and permafrost; ocean wamring; impacts to water resources, agriculture, public health and national security

Climate scientists discuss what they know about global climate change today, and how they know it.

Carbon dioxide is everywhere: in the air, rising from cracks in the ocean floor, and in your soda can. Now it's showing up in the news! Find out why carbon dioxide is such a hot topic, and why it's going to be around for a long, long time.

Richard Feely discusses new findings about how increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic, and how that will affect ocean ecosystems and the marine animals that inhabit them.
 

Richard Feely discusses new findings about how increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic, and how that will affect ocean ecosystems and the marine animals that inhabit them.
 

Better Growth, Better Climate: The New Climate Economy Report

A new report released by the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate concludes that rapid innovation and new investment in infrastructure are making it possible to tackle climate change while also improving economic performance.

This forum will focus on how to make homes and businesses in the Northeast safer when extreme weather events or natural disasters occur.

This OSU webinar will provide an overview of how interested stakeholders can obtain information from NOAA’s climate service offices.

If you are someone who wants more or stronger ENSO events in the future, I have great news for you–research supports that. If you are someone who wants fewer or weaker ENSO events in the future, don’t worry–research supports that too.

Reducing Coastal Risk on the East and Gulf Coasts

This new National Research Council report reviews coastal risk-reduction strategies and levels of protection that have been used along the U.S. East and Gulf Coasts to reduce the impacts of flooding associated with storm surges. The report evaluates their effectiveness in terms of economic return, protection of life safety, and minimization of environmental effects.

Authors of a new National Academies report discuss what the U.S. can do to better prepare for the increasing risk of coastal flooding.

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