Includes sea level rise; extreme weather; changes to ecosystems, plants and animals; melting ice and permafrost; ocean wamring; impacts to water resources, agriculture, public health and national security

The focal theme of this year's EMS Annual Meeting is High Impact Weather: Working in Partnership to Reduce Risk. By focusing talks and sessions around this theme, organizers hope to emphasize the partnership dimension of meteorological services.

2013 Draft National Climate Assessment

 

Global climate is changing, and this is apparent across the U.S. in a wide range of observations. Rising temperatures, changes in precipitation and extreme events and their causes and impacts on society and the environment are chronicled in the 2013 National Climate Assessment. A team of over 240 experts compiled the report, which is open for public comment through April 12, 2013.

Climatological Data

Monthly editions contain station daily maximum and minimum temperatures and precipitation. Some stations provide daily snowfall, snow depth, evaporation, and soil temperature data. Each issue also contains monthly summaries for heating and cooling degree days (65 degrees Fbase). The July issue also contains monthly heating degree days and snow data for the preceding July through June. The annual issue contains monthly and annual averages of temperature, precipitation, temperature extremes, freeze data, soil temperatures, evaporation, and a recap of monthly cooling degree days.

2012 Arctic Report Card

The annual Report Card provides clear, concise scientific information on the state of the Arctic region, organized into 5 sections: Atmosphere, Sea Ice & Ocean, Marine Ecosystems, Terrestrial Ecosystems, and Hydrology & Terrestrial Cryosphere. This edition was prepared by an international team of 121 scientists from 14 different countries. Independent peer-review of the 2012 Report Card was organized by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme of the Arctic Council.

Energy for America's Future

Details from the current White House policy on energy security and confronting climate change.

National Fish, Wildlife and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy

From the Arctic to the Everglades, impacts like rising sea levels, warmer temperatures, loss of sea ice, and changing precipitation patterns are affecting the species we care about, the services we value, and the places we call home. Federal, state, and tribal partners with input from many other diverse groups from across the nation have worked to develop a common strategy to respond to these challenges.

Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force Progress Report

A report from the White House Climate Change Adaptation Task Force outlining the federal government's progress towards better understanding, preparing for, and responding to extreme events and other climate change impacts.

America’s Climate Choices

This is the final report in the America’s Climate Choices series. It includes analysis by scientists, engineers, economists, business leaders and policy experts on how to address climate change in the United States. The report advocates for an iterative risk management approach to climate change and using strong federal climate policies to support and enhance existing local, state and private sector efforts. It identifies four key areas policymakers should focus on.

Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation

The Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation, released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in May 2011, assesses existing literature on the future potential of renewable energy for the mitigation of climate change. It covers the six most important renewable energy technologies, as well as their integration into present and future energy systems.

Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change

Much of the nation’s experience to date in managing and protecting its people, resources, and infrastructure is based on the historic record of climate variability during a period of relatively stable climate. This report from the America’s Climate Choices suite of studies concludes that adaptation to climate change calls for a new paradigm--one that considers a range of possible future climate conditions and associated impacts, some well outside the realm of past experience.

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