This short cartoon video uses a simple baseball analogy (steroid use increases probability of hitting home runs) to explain how small increases in greenhouse gases can cause global temperature changes and increase the probability of extreme weather events.

In this short video from ClimateCentral, host Jessica Harrop explains what evidence scientists have for claiming that recent global warming is caused by humans and is not just part of a natural cycle.

This interactive exposes students to Earth's atmospheric gases of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and ozone. As the user manipulates the interactive to increase or decrease the concentration of each gas, explanations and images are provided that explain and visualize what the Earth would be like in each scenario.

Global Anthropogenic Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions: 1990-2030

This summary report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provides historical and projected estimates of emissions of non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gases (GHGs) from anthropogenic sources. The report provides a consistent and comprehensive estimate of non-CO2 greenhouse gases for 92 individual countries and eight regions. The analysis provides information that can be used to understand national contributions of GHG emissions, historical progress on reductions, and mitigation opportunities.

U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Inventory: 1990-2008

The U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Inventory: 1990-2008 (USDA GHG Inventory) is a comprehensive assessment of greenhouse gas emissions and sinks in U.S. agriculture and forests. The USDA GHG Inventory provides extensive, in-depth emissions and sinks estimates for livestock, cropland, and forests as well as energy consumption in livestock and cropland agriculture. 

Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation

The Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation, released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in May 2011, assesses existing literature on the future potential of renewable energy for the mitigation of climate change. It covers the six most important renewable energy technologies, as well as their integration into present and future energy systems.

Assessing Economic Impacts of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

Reliable estimates of the costs and benefits to the U.S. economy for various emissions reduction and adaptation strategies are critical to federal climate change R&D portfolio planning and investment decisions. At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Academies organized a workshop to consider these issues. The workshop participants discussed three dimensions: policy, analysis, and economics.

Strategies to Promote Commercialization and Deployment of Greenhouse Gas Intensity-Reducing Technologies and Practices

This report systematically examines the market readiness of key technologies important to meeting climate change mitigation goals.  It assesses the barriers and business risks impeding their progress and greater market application.  The report was sponsored by the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program (a multi-agency group led by the U.S. Department of Energy) and was submitted to the President and Congress in January 2009.

Climate Projections Based on Emissions Scenarios for Long-Lived and Short-Lived Radiatively Active Gases and Aerosols

An assessment of the effects of short-lived gases and particles in the atmosphere. They can significantly change regional surface temperatures. By the year 2100 short-lived gases and particles may account for as much as 40 percent of the warming over the continental U.S. in summertime.

Scenarios of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Atmospheric Concentrations

The findings presented in this report draw from scenarios designed to stabilize the influence of a suite of greenhouse gases. Three climate-modeling groups independently developed a reference scenario and then developed four contrasting stabilization scenarios for comparison.

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