Though ENSO is a single climate phenomenon, it has three states, or phases, it can be in. The two opposite phases, “El Niño” and “La Niña,” require certain changes in both the ocean and the atmosphere because ENSO is a coupled climate phenomenon. “Neutral” is in the middle of the continuum.

A team of climate scientists—actual nerds!—discuss the current El Niño Watch and offer perspectives and analysis on the progression of El Niño.

This National Geographic video explains the origins of the El NiÃo Southern Oscillation using animations and shows the impacts on humans, wildlife and habitat, particularly in the United States.

Pacific ENSO Update

The Pacific ENSO Update is a bulletin of the Pacific El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Applications Climate Center, providing information on climate variability for the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands. This newsletter is intended to supply information for the benefit of those involved in such climate-sensitive sectors as civil defense, resource management, and developmental planning in the various jurisdictions of the islands.

NOAA OceanWatch

OceanWatch-Central Pacific acquires and processes satellite information and creates a variety of satellite data products for the Pacific Ocean region. We provide daily satellite observations of the Central Pacific Region.

AgroClimate

An open-source suite of tools developed specifically for farmers and ranchers in the southeastern U.S. Tools available can help growers plan for certain types of crop disease, crop yields, climate and drought risks, growing degree days, greenhouse gas emissions, and water usage.

NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Service Center Publications

A regularly updated database of reports, theses, working papers, and more written by PIFSC staff and collaborators.

Climate Change and Marine Protected Areas

Information on Marine Protected Areas and climate change, including products from the MPA Federal Advisory Committee, training information, and program links.

TreeFlow

TreeFlow is a comprehensive web resource for tree-ring reconstructions of streamflow and climate, providing easy access to reconstruction data as well as information about how the data were developed, and can be used. Originally developed by researchers at the Climate Assessment for the Southwest, TreeFlow has a growing collection of tree ring constructions for river basins throughout the Western United States.

Cal-Adapt

Cal-Adapt is a web-based climate adaptation planning tool developed in part by the University of California, Berkeley's Geospatial Innovation Facility for the State of California. Cal-Adapt allows users to identify potential climate change risks in specific geographic areas throughout the state. Users can either query by location, or click on an interactive map to explore what climate impacts are projected to occur in their area of interest.

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