Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis

On September 27, 2013, Working Group I of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) presented its report to member governments for approval and acceptance. The report is the first of four that will make up the IPCC's 5th Assessment.

Climate Sensitivity of the Nation's Estuaries

The United States' 28 National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERR) are experiencing negative effects of human and climate-related stressors, according to a new report from NOAA's National Ocean Service. This is the first national-scale climate sensitivity analysis of estuaries to help coastal managers protect the health of estuaries.

Pacific ENSO Update

The Pacific ENSO Update is a bulletin of the Pacific El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Applications Climate Center, providing information on climate variability for the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands. This newsletter is intended to supply information for the benefit of those involved in such climate-sensitive sectors as civil defense, resource management, and developmental planning in the various jurisdictions of the islands.

Climate Change in the Pacific: Scientific Assessment and New Research

This is a rigorously researched, peer-reviewed scientific assessment of the climate of the Western Pacific region. Building on the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, this two-volume publication represents a comprehensive resource on the climate of the Pacific.

Asia-Pacific Data Research Center

The Asia-Pacific Data Research Center increases understanding of climate variability in the Asia-Pacific region by developing the computational, data management, and networking infrastructure necessary to make data resources readily accessible and usable to researchers and general users; and by undertaking data-intensive research activities that will both advance knowledge and lead to improvements in data preparation and data products.

This activity uses geophysical and geochemical data to determine climate in Central America during the recent past and to explore the link between climate (wet periods and drought) and population growth/demise among the Maya. Students use ocean drilling data to interpret climate and to consider the influence of climate on the Mayan civilization.

In this activity for undergraduates, students explore the CLIMAP (Climate: Long-Range Investigation, Mapping and Prediction) model results for differences between the modern and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and discover the how climate and vegetation may have changed in different regions of the Earth based on scientific data.

In this activity from the Deep Earth Academy, students divide into groups to read and discuss one of nine short articles (1-2 pages) about research done by the Ocean Drilling Program. These articles discuss our understanding about past climate based on collected data. These articles briefly describe the research conducted and the findings. Students use the information from the article to complete a write-up that they share with other students. An extension activity involves examining ocean drilling data using Google Earth.

This activity with a lab report instructs students to solve and plot 160,000 years' worth of ice core data from the Vostok ice core using Excel or similar spreadsheets to analyze data. Students learn about ice cores and what they can tell us about past atmospheric conditions and the past atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and CH4.

In this activity, students will use oxygen isotope values of two species of modern coral to reconstruct ambient water temperature over a four-year period. They use Microsoft Excel, or similar application, to create a spreadsheet of temperature values calculated from the isotope values of the corals by means of an algebraic equation. Students then use correlation and regression techniques to determine whether isotope records can be considered to be good proxies for records of past temperatures.

Pages

Hide [X]