This in-depth interactive slideshow about how climate models work is embedded with a lot of background information. It also describes some of the projected climate change impacts to key sectors such as water, ecosystems, food, coasts, health. (scroll down page for interactive)

Global Sea Level Rise Scenarios for the United States National Climate Assessment

Global sea level has been steadily rising for decades and is expected to continue. Scientists have very high confidence that global sea level will rise at least another 8 inches and as much as 6.6 feet by 2100, causing significant impacts in U.S. coastal regions.  This report lays out the science and describes possible scenarios to help planners and policy leaders assess the risks.

Climate Stabilization Targets

Greenhouse gas emissions and increased global temperature will change weather, climate, ecosystems, and food supply. Each degree Celsius (1.8 deg Fahrenheit) increase in global average temperature (up to 4 deg C) would likely result in the following: 5% to 10% less total rain in southwest North America, the Mediterranean, and southern Africa; 5% to 10% less streamflow in some river basins; 5% to 15% lower yields of some crops. The document clarifies short- and long-term consequences of various scenarios.

Abrupt Climate Change

An assessment of abrupt climate change events where key aspects of Earth's climate system change faster than the responsible forcings would suggest and/or faster than society can respond. This report examines four types of abrupt change in Earth's past that were so rapid and so large in their impact that if they were to recur today they would pose clear risks to society in terms of our ability to adapt.

Decision-Support Experiments and Evaluations Using Seasonal-to-Interannual Forecasts and Observational Data: A Focus on Water Resources

An evaluation of decision support experiments that have used seasonal-to-interannual climate forecasts and observational data. Earth's climate varies naturally and also changes in response to human activity. Our ability to adapt and respond to climate depends on our understanding of the system and how to incorporate this understanding into resource management decisions.

Uses and Limitations of Observations, Data, Forecasts, and Other Projections in Decision Support for Selected Sectors and Regions

Scientific information about Earth's climate, water, air, land, and other dynamic processes is essential for our understanding of humankind's relationship to our natural resources and our environment. This report examines contributions of Earth science information in decision support activities and their relationship to climate change science.

Climate Impacts on U.S. Living Marine Resources: National Marine Fisheries Service Concerns, Activities and Needs

A 2008 report on climate impacts on coastal and marine ecosystems as it relates to the National Marine Fisheries Service's work.

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