Although they are related, meteorology and climatology have important differences, particularly in how scientists develop and use weather and climate models. What makes climatologists think they can project climate scenarios decades into the future when meteorologists cannot accurately predict weather more than two weeks in advance? This presentation by Wayne Higgins of NOAA's Climate Prediction Center clarifies the relationships and differences between weather and climate, as well as the differences between natural climate variability and human-induced climate change.

Starting in July, when you hear that a day was hotter, or colder, or rainier than normal, that normal will be a little different from what it was in the past.

Above-average sea surface temperatures, a natural cycle of increased hurricane activity, and a fading La Nina have influenced the 2011 Atlantic hurricane outlook.

Deep snow that fell across the Great Plains and the Northeast in late January and early February is the latest installment in the second very wintry winter in a row for the eastern U.S.

More than half of the United States experienced heat, drought, or flooding during 2011, demonstrating the power and momentum of climate extremes.

 Researchers at NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center collaborate with tropical cyclone centers and scientific agencies around the world to assemble and maintain the International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS), an inventory of tropical cyclones.

Researchers Offer New Insights Into Predicting Future Droughts in California

According to a new NOAA-sponsored study, natural oceanic and atmospheric patterns are the primary drivers behind California's ongoing drought.

U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit

In response to the President's Executive Order 13653, a NOAA-led U.S. federal agency partnership released the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit to provide tools, information, & scientific expertise to help communities & businesses build resilience to climate-related impacts & extreme events.

This Webinar outlines research examining six high-impact weather events in Alaska, from 1974 to 2012.

Speakers: Lauren Zuromski, Hollings Scholar; Rick Thoman, National Weather Service; & John Walsh, ACCAP

Explaining Extreme Events of 2013 from a Climate Perspective

A new report from the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, "Explaining Extreme Events of 2013 from a Climate Perspective," addresses the causes of 16 individual extreme events that occurred on four continents.

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