Starting in July, when you hear that a day was hotter, or colder, or rainier than normal, that normal will be a little different from what it was in the past.

Above-average sea surface temperatures, a natural cycle of increased hurricane activity, and a fading La Nina have influenced the 2011 Atlantic hurricane outlook.

Deep snow that fell across the Great Plains and the Northeast in late January and early February is the latest installment in the second very wintry winter in a row for the eastern U.S.

More than half of the United States experienced heat, drought, or flooding during 2011, demonstrating the power and momentum of climate extremes.

 Researchers at NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center collaborate with tropical cyclone centers and scientific agencies around the world to assemble and maintain the International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS), an inventory of tropical cyclones.

This Webinar outlines research examining six high-impact weather events in Alaska, from 1974 to 2012.

Speakers: Lauren Zuromski, Hollings Scholar; Rick Thoman, National Weather Service; & John Walsh, ACCAP

Explaining Extreme Events of 2013 from a Climate Perspective

A new report from the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, "Explaining Extreme Events of 2013 from a Climate Perspective," addresses the causes of 16 individual extreme events that occurred on four continents.

This OSU webinar will provide an overview of how interested stakeholders can obtain information from NOAA’s climate service offices.

This is the first of nine lessons in the "Visualizing and Understanding the Science of Climate Change" website. This lesson is an introduction to Earth's climate and covers key principles regarding Earth's unique climate, atmosphere, and regional and temporal climate differences.

This webinar will examine how variations in the tropical Pacific can affect high-latitude regions such as Alaska.

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